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Management Tips
August 1, 2004
Management Tips August 2004

NOTE TO READERS: If you would like to receive our Sales & Management Tips newsletters directly, just send your name and e-mail address to JoeKlock@aol.com, with "SEND NEWSLETTERS" in the subject line.

FIGHTING THE "F" WORD WITHIN YOUR TEAM

No, not "that" word, of course, but it got your attention, didn't it?

The "F" word you'll find yourself fighting as you strive to get the best out of your followers is FEAR - specifically fear of change.

In some instances, the cost of that change is no more than facing the risk of failure, but this alone can be sufficient to maintain a "status quo" attitude.

In many such cases, "failure" is an exaggerated term - although it serves well as a justification for not doing something new, even to remedy an undesirable situation..

The actual price tag is seldom more than the possibility of embarrassment, of feeling foolish, of being conspicuous and/or of making a mistake, perhaps worsened by the subsequent ridicule, criticism, disapproval and/or rejection by others.

Yet reluctance to pay even these quite reasonable price tags prevents many people from standing up to challenge and change.

Your people can do lots more than they think they can, but if they merely think they can't, they won't. (There was no story ever written about the little engine that couldn't!)

Truth to tell, the price of commitment is often failure, and big achievers know more about it than mediocre performers.

The only sure way to avoid failure is to do nothing; unhappily, that's also the surest way of avoiding success.

Being a temporary failure is a world apart from being a lifelong loser.

(Excerpted from "In Search Of Maximence," by Joe Klock, Sr., available soon as a 4-CD album.)

 

MANAGEMENT 101

This recruiting tip from movie director John Huston (quoted in "Trisler Times" - www.nobullselling.com/times):

"Cast correctly and you don't have to direct."

Variation from The KlockWorks: "Hire right and you'll fire less often."

 

PLUG THIS INTO YOUR FUTURE PLANNING

Beloit (Wisconsin) College recently listed the "mind set" of the Class of 2007.

Before you say "Who cares?" remember that these are the customers you'll have to be ready to serve in a few short years, and their view of "things" may be vastly different from yours!

Following are excerpts from fifty "reality checks" on the Beloit list:

- They are not familiar with the source of that "Giant Sucking Sound."

- Bert and Ernie are old enough to be their parents.

- An automatic is a weapon, not a transmission.

- Gasoline has always been unleaded.

- They have never been able to find the (typewriter)"return" key.

- Computers have always fit into their back packs.

- Stores have always had checkout scanners..

- Directory assistance has never been free.

- They have always been able to make phone calls from airplanes.

- They have never seen a First Lady in a fur coat.

Granted, the above details may be unimportant, and irrelevant to real estate, but unless they resonate with YOUR mind set, they raise questions about your ability to deal with tomorrow's buyers and sellers.

The answers, my friend, are blowing in the wind (words they've probably never heard!)

 

AFFIRMATION OF THE MONTH

Sell this one to the team:

"I TAKE IT IN STRIDE WHEN PEOPLE TRY TO PUT ME DOWN"

Tell your people to visualize situations wherein others have insulted them, offended them or otherwise tried to make them feel inferior.

Then have them picture themselves saying, "I'm sorry you feel that way," and going on with their lives, repeating the line as often as necessary to fend off the offender.

Remind them of Eleanor Roosevelt's advice: "Nobody can make you feel inferior without first obtaining your consent."

There's also this, from an old TV commercial: "NEVER let 'em see you sweat!")

 

TRAINING TIP FROM TWAIN

One of the seldom-recognized barriers to effective sales training is the unconscious resistance of some trainees.

It's sometimes called "selective acceptance," a thought process in which the trainee decides to reject certain techniques as personally unacceptable - such things, for example as approaching friends and relatives for leads, asking for the order and continuing to press for "yes" after the first "no" (or the second, third, etc.).

There is a "GOTTAWANTA" factor which must be present before trainees can benefit from even the best training material and the efforts of the best mentors.

If they silently say, "I can't (or I won't, or I just don't want to) do something, the best result that can be expected is lip service, apparent acquiescence and subsequent failure on the firing line.

He certainly didn't have sales training in mind when he wrote these words, but Mark Twain's advice is right-smack on the point.

As he somewhat irreverently put it, "Never try to teach a pig to sing. It wastes your time and it just annoys the pig."

Any "oinks" in the chorus of your in-training tyros?

Or, for that matter, your vacillating veterans?

 

SURFING FOR SUCCESS?

Real estate guru and super-techie Allen Hainge, founder of the CyberStars, asked the heavy hitters in his awe-inspiring group to share their choice of the Web sites that they most rely on in their businesses and to help them personally.

The ones most frequently mentioned were (in random order):

www.SoarSolutions.net

www.VisualTour.com

www.MyHomeOwnersClub.com

www.eMailaCard.com

www.ExpressCopy.com

www.ColorForRealEstate.com

www.PrintDepartment.com

www.eFrogg.com

www.GooderGroup.com

www.Imprev.net

What's in each one and how can it help your team?

Three ways to get the answer:

1. Spring for Allen's excellent new book: "Secrets of the CybertStars" (details at www.CyberStars.net), or

2. Get on your "surfboard" and check 'em out for yourself. If any of the shoes fit, put 'em on and start running!.

3. Do both of the above.

Any of these strategies beats heck out of forwarding chain letters, chewing on spam or downloading the latest cyberdirt.

 

IF YOU CAN’T WIN, DON’T PLAY

J. Paul Getty, who became a billionaire when a billion bucks was still a lot of money, was a great admirer of Julius Caesar, whom he regarded as "the ablest man that history records."

He noted, though, that "Caesar’s one great weakness was his inability to distinguish between the possible and the impossible."

Prudent management demands that one carefully separate the goals that are difficult from those that are unattainable, no matter how attractive the latter objectives may appear!

 
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The KlockWorks, Inc

606 Island Drive

Key Largo, Florida  33037

305-451-0079

joeklock@aol.com   www.joeklock.com